bette buna farm

in sidama

D’ara Otilicho in the Sidama language, (Taferi Kela in the main language Amaric), is one of the poorest and isolated districts in the Central-South of Ethiopia.  The district densly populated by internally displaced people. Over 100 years ago it were our grandfather Syoum and grandmother Emame who – after periods of insecurity- found their place in Taferi Kela and started their family and 2-hectare coffee farm in here.

When Dawit’s grandfather passed away in 2019, we saw how dependent the local community was on the farm and how
much of a role model he had been, so we decided to take over, learn everything we could, and scale up.

Farm D'ara Otilicho/ Taferi Kela

In 202 we officially took over the farm of grandfather Syoum. We started with two hectares, but immediately made plans to expand; you can’t make much of an impact on only two hectares!


The farm was not in a good shape, as  our family was struggling and they did not see much of a future perspective on it.  There were coffee trees over 85 years old, barely giving any production. Harvesting techniques were lacking and the soil We invested in re-forestation and replaced so far almost 90% of all old 

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Nursery D'ara Otilicho

We breed infant plants in our nursery in D’ara Otilicho/Taferi Kela, where we also work on developing new varieties that are resistant to the effects of climate change. We investigate which varietals work well at different altitudes with, temperatures, and levels of rainfall. It’s increasingly important for our plants to be able to tolerate in one day the amount of heavy rainfall that might have previously fallen over two weeks, as well as variable amounts of sunlight.

A lot of farmers here don’t have the resources to replace their trees, so they keep working with older trees that are much more susceptible to disease. That can also make the soil very poor quality because of
the failure to rotate crops.

This research is crucial for our own sustainability, but also we make the seedlings available to other farmers. We select small farms that are a great inspiration to sustainable farm methods, including the social aspect. We give away half of the infants to them each year. 

Sidama- D'ara Otilicho

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The coffees we produce in Sidamo

limited micro lots

Honey Anaerobics
Natural Anaerobics
Honeys
Extended naturals
Single farm

single farm lots

Naturals
Washed
single farm

community macro lots

Natural
Washed

About our quality control

Quality is one of our core values. To start with the quality of coffee. We educate our own farm and milling managers and train them, in a practical way, all the critical points when coffee quality can be impacted. From coffee harvest up the last bagging process, ready to be exported.

We invested in our own facilities including a lab in order to control at key points the coffee we supply to you. And it is also this facility, where we educate young trainees from the coffee community in the grading and scoring of coffees.  

But quality means more to us, than only the quality of product. Bette Buna believes quality for life and planet goes hand in hand, with the quality level of service and product that we like to supply our partners with. 

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